Thursday, April 7, 2011

Gluten Free Hamburger Buns, Egg Substitutes and Tics and Tourette's

Quail Eggs
My blog is based on the premise that eliminating certain foods promotes good health for some people.  For many, this includes gluten, dairy and refined sugar.  But what about eggs?  If you've been diagnosed with a sensitivity to eggs, the standard advice is to eliminate them from your diet for a period of three to six months, and then try again.  In my family, elimination of chicken eggs was a disaster.  It led to a severe drop in mood and an increase in severity of tics.  You know, those involuntary movements that afflict 5 to 20 percent of school age children?

Supplementing with soy lecithin helped remove the tics, but nothing was as good as eggs.   Our doctor suggested eating duck or quail eggs in lieu of chicken eggs.  Harder to find, yes, but baking was all of a sudden a lot easier.  You can find duck and quail eggs in some natural food stores or farmers markets.  Other web resources to aid in your search include Eat Wild and Local Harvest, or try a google search in your geographical area.

Eventually, our doctor prescribed sublingual immunotherapy to take a couple of times a day and before every meal that contains chicken eggs.   Since we've started the drops, we've had very few problems with chicken eggs.  If you are interested in finding a doctor to help you with this, medical training is provided from organizations such as the American Academy of Environmental Medicine.  You can search for doctors through their website by state.

Eating eggs or supplementing with lecithin may not be the answer for everyone with tics or Tourette's.  The picture is often more complicated, necessitating changes in diet, and restoring gastrointestinal health.  An excellent resource on this topic is the book  Breakthrough Discoveries in Natural Treatments:  Tics and Tourette's.

Chicken, duck and quail eggs come in varying sizes, and lend slightly different consistencies to baked goods.  The best way to learn about them is to try them in familiar recipes.  Here are some of my latest experiments.

Whole Grain Hamburger Buns

This also makes an excellent dinner roll.

Ingredients:

1 cup brown rice flour
3/4 cup potato flour
1/2 cup almond flour
1/2 cup teff flour
1/4 cup chia seeds plus 2 tbsp (for soaking), divided
2 tsp xanthan gum (or guar gum for corn free)
1 tbsp baking powder (use Hain featherweight for corn free)
1 tsp baking soda
1 tsp sea salt
3/4 cup plus 2 tbsp hemp milk (sweetened, plain)
2 duck eggs
1/2 cup water
1/4 cup olive oil
1 tbsp brown rice syrup, honey or agave (or add 2 tbsp sweetener and reduce hemp milk by 1 tbsp)
1 tsp apple cider vinegar

Directions:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Mix 1/2 cup water with 2 tbsp chia seeds in a small bowl and set aside.  Mix remaining 9 dry ingredients in a large bowl.  Add hemp milk, eggs, olive oil, brown rice syrup, cider vinegar and chia mixture to a mixer and blend well.  Add about a third of the dry ingredients at a time, and mix well.  Divide into 12 balls and form into bun shapes.  They will rise slightly in the oven.  Place on a greased cookie sheet and cook for 20 minutes, or until lightly browned.  Makes one dozen.  Freeze leftovers.  Source:  www.foodsensitivityjournal.com

White Hamburger Buns

Ingredients:

1 package Chebe all purpose mix
2 chicken eggs or 9 to 10 quail eggs
1/2 cup rice milk (plain, sweetened)
2 tbsp vegetable oil
2 tbsp tapioca flour

Directions:

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Mix eggs, rice milk and vegetable oil in a large bowl.  Add package of Chebe mix, and mix with a fork until blended well.  Add 1 tbsp tapioca flour and mix.  Flour your hand (to prevent sticking) with the remaining tapioca flour and knead dough until smooth.  Divide into four balls and form into flat bun shapes.  They will rise quite a bit in the oven.  Place on an ungreased cookie sheet and bake for 38 minutes.  Makes four buns.  Freeze leftovers.  Source:  www.foodsensitivityjournal.com

This post has been shared with Food on Fridays, Fight Back Friday, Monday Mania, Slightly Indulgent Tuesday.

7 comments:

  1. That's really interesting that eggs had such a huge effect! I am uncertain as to whether I have an egg sensitivity - when I was at my friend's farm over the summer, I ate some of their farm fresh free range eggs and they didn't seem to bother me but other things with eggs in them seem to bother me. Hrm. I wonder if I would react differently to different bird's eggs?

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  2. Thank you for all the interesting information. An egg at breakfast helped my grandson ease a tic that he developed in first grade.

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  3. Hi! I assume your children just had sensitivity to eggs and not life threatening food allergies, right? My son has the other and it is really hard to get recipes to work w/o eggs sometimes. Have you tried these buns w/o eggs? They look great! I do consider potato flour to be refined flour, but these look better than most!

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  4. Hi Adrienne, no I haven't tried them without eggs. I feel for you though. We went through a period of egg free baking and it is hard!! If I were going to replace the eggs, I would double the wet chia mixture (soak 2 tbsp chia with 1/2 cup water). I don't know if this will work, but if you try, I'd love to hear how it turns out!

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  5. I'm really excited about your whole grain bun recipe - the look really tasty! I've added the recipe to Favorite Recipes of Last Week post. Check it out! Thanks, ~Aubree

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  6. Your whole grain gf hamburger buns look so irresistable & tasty too!
    MMMMMMMMM,....! Even your white hamburger buns look equally good! Yum!

    A great post!:)

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  7. Since I do not have an anaphylactic reaction to eggs, I decided to try the duck eggs, and was greatly looking forward to eating them. I have given them a try 3 times over the past few months, but each time I get severe gastrointestinal distress and... I won't go into details. My IgG testing had shown me to react to both the chicken egg whites as well as the egg yolks and the IgE skin-scratch testing showed me to additionally react strongly to chickens(feathers )- I am not sure if any of that maybe has something to do with my reaction to other poultry eggs.

    If I ever came across quail eggs, I think I would still at least give them a try.

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